Mozart Symphonies

Every Saturday in December at 14:00

 

Saturday, December 1 at 14:10 | Mozart - Symphony No. 40, K. 550

Gianluigi Gelmetti conducts the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart in a performance of W. A. Mozart’s Symphony No. 40 in G Minor (K. 550), directed for television by Janos Darvas. The work was composed in 1788 and is sometimes referred to as the "Great G minor symphony", with the Symphony No. 25 being the "Little G minor symphony". The two are the only of Mozart’s 41 symphonies that were written in a minor key. It is arguably the most popular of all of Mozart’s symphonies. The catchy opening melody became one of the most popular ringtones of mobile phones in the 90s. Scholars are not in agreement whether it was popular in Mozart’s own time. The composer performed it a few times and rewrote some parts of the score.


Saturday, December 8 at 14:00 | Mozart - Symphony No. 31, K. 297

Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Salzburg Orchestra in a performance of Mozart’s “Paris” Symphony No. 31 (K. 297). Mozart composed the work in 1778, during his unsuccessful job-hunting time in Paris. The opening movement of the “Paris” symphony is one of the grandest and most thrilling sounds Mozart ever made from an orchestra. The composer used the clarinets for the first time in a symphony, having heard the new instrument earlier in Mannheim. With horns, trumpets, timpani, and a full section of woodwind with flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, it is the biggest orchestra the composer had used until then. This broadcast is directed by János Darvos.


Saturday, December 15 at 14:10 | Mozart - Symphony No. 36, K. 425

Jeffrey Tate conducts the English Chamber Orchestra in a performance of W. A. Mozart’s “Linzer” Symphony No. 36 (K. 475). The broadcast is directed by János Darvas. Mozart composed the work in 1783, during his short stay in the Austrian town of Linz, on the way home from Vienna to Salzburg. The symphony was written in an impressive span of only four days to accommodate a local concert. The premier took place on November 4 and premiered in Vienna the year after. The introduction of trumpets and drums in the second movement is an unusual feature of the piece. The closing Presto is provided with some contrapuntal passages to contrast the homophonic texture.


Saturday, December 22 at 14:05 | Mozart - Symphony No. 41, K. 551

Jeffrey Tate conducts the English Chamber Orchestra in a performance of Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony No. 41 (K. 551). This symphony is the last of a set of three that Mozart composed in rapid succession during the summer of 1788. The symphony is known for its humour, exuberant energy and grand scale for a symphony of this period, hence its nickname “Jupiter”. Generally, Mozart composed from commissions, but scholars have found no indication of this for the 41st Symphony. It could well be Mozart composed the work in the hopes of selling them or presenting them in a concert in Vienna. Directed by János Darvos.


Saturday, December 29 at 14:05 | Mozart - Symphony No. 38, K. 504

Gerd Albrecht conducts the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie in a performance of W. A. Mozart’s “Prague” Symphony No. 38 (K. 504). Directed by János Darvas. The work was composed by Mozart in late 1786 and premiered in January 1787, during the composer’s first visit to Prague, hence the nickname “Prague”. An unusual feature of the symphony is that it consists of only three movements, making it the only major symphonic work from the Classical period without a minuet or scherzo movement. The symphony opens with an Adagio introduction followed by a hugely powerful Allegro, with dramatic qualities that foreshadow Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. Directed by János Darvas.