Bernstein & Mahler

August 6 to 10

 

Stingray Brava devotes all of August to Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), as Saturday, August 25 marks the famous American conductor, composer and pianist's centenary! Stingray Brava celebrates the renowned maestro's life and work with new concert footage, in which Bernstein's music takes center stage!

Naturally, Stingray Brava could not let Leonard Bernstein's 100th birthday go unnoticed: this legendary musician was one of the most multi-faceted figures of 20th-century classical music. Consequently, Stingray Brava devotes many August evenings to programs which feature Bernstein in his manifold roles as conductor, piano soloist, and composer! 

From 1958 to 1969, Bernstein was the New York Philharmonic's music director, producing recordings of all Mahler symphonies. Gustav Mahler's music held a special place in Bernstein's heart; therefore it is only natural that Stingray Brava's Bernstein month opens with a week of Mahler. On the evening of August 6, baritone Thomas Hampson sings Mahler's Rückert-Lieder, Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen and Kindertotenlieder. On the evenings of August 7 to 10, Bernstein heads the Vienna Philharmonik in eight of Mahler's ten symphonies.


Monday, August 6 at 21:00 | Leonard Bernstein: Little Drummerboy

In this musical essay, Leonard Bernstein recollects and relives his experiences with the music of the great Austrian composer and conductor Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). Bernstein filmed all of Mahler's ten symphonies. The essay illustrates the fundamental concepts of Leonard Bernstein's interpretation of Mahler's works, and exposes not only the building material and framework of Mahler's brilliant structures, but also the tensional pulls within them. Searching for the musical roots and the hidden truths guiding the composer, Leonard Bernstein discovers the key to Mahler's music.


Monday, August 6 at 22:25 | Mahler - Ruckertlieder    

Baritone Thomas Hampson and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra perform Gustav Mahler's Rückert-Lieder under the direction of Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). This 1990 concert was filmed in the great hall of Vienna's legendary Musikverein. The Rückert-Lieder are five songs by Mahler, all based on poems by the German Friedrich Rückert. Mahler composed them in 1901, the same year as his Symphony No. 5. During this period, the composer put several of Rückert's texts into music, including the Kindertotenlieder song cycle. Although the Rückert-Lieder pieces do not form a cycle, they are generally interpreted together.    


Monday, August 6 at 22:50 | Mahler - Lieder eines fahrendes Gesellen

Baritone Thomas Hampson and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra perform Gustav Mahler's Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen under the direction of Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). This 1990 concert was filmed in the great hall of Vienna's legendary Musikverein. This cycle is composed of four songs, whose texts are signed by the composer from the folk poems Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Enchanted Corinth of the Child). Mahler composed these songs in 1884 and 1885, but this revised orchestral version was performed for the first time in 1896. Some of his melodies can also be heard in Mahler's Symphony No. 1.


Monday, August 6 at 23:10 | Mahler - Kindertotenlieder    

Baritone Thomas Hampson and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra perform Gustav Mahler's Kindertotenlieder under the direction of Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). This 1990 concert was filmed in the great hall of Vienna's legendary Musikverein. Mahler completed this cycle of five songs in 1904. The Kindertotenlieder are based on the many poems - 428, to be exact - from the homonymous cycle of the German poet Friedrich Rückert, composed after the death of two of his children as a result of scarlet fever.


Tuesday, August 7 at 14:00 | Mahler - Symphony No. 1    

The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performs Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 1 in D major under the direction of Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). This 1975 concert was filmed at Vienna's Wiener Konzerthaus. To compose this play, Mahler was inspired by the novel Titan by Jean Paul, in which a young man gifted for the arts, but unable to find his place in society and consumed by despair, decides to put an end to his life. The genesis of the work was not easy for Mahler: he composed it between 1887 and 1888, at the time when he was conductor of the Leipzig opera. The first version of the work took the form of a two-part symphonic poem, the first of which was presented in Budapest in 1898. However, the work has not been popular and critically acclaimed, so that Mahler was forced to make changes. This new version gave rise to the magnificent Symphony No. 1 that we know today, and which is a tour de force for such a young composer.


Tuesday, August 7 at 21:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 2 in C minor (Resurrection)

Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in C minor (Resurrection) with Sheila Armstrong (soprano), Janet Baker (mezzo-soprano), the Edinburgh Festival Chorus and the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein. This recording was filmed at Ely Cathedral, England. Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. "All Mahler symphonies, all Mahler works for that matter, deal in extremes, extremes of dynamic, of tempo, of emotional meaning. When it is bare, it's extremely bare, when it is thick and rich, it's thicker and richer than anything in 'Götterdämmerung', and when it is suffering it suffers to a point that no music has ever suffered before." (Leonard Bernstein)


Wednesday, August 8 at 14:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 3 in D minor    

Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. This recording of the Third Symphony with Christa Ludwig (alto), The Chorus of the Vienna State Opera, the Vienna Boys' Choir and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was filmed at the Vienna Musikvereinssaal. "My symphony will be something that the world has never heard before! In this score, all nature speaks and tells such deep secrets as one may intuit in a dream", wrote Mahler about his Third.

 

Wednesday, August 8 at 21:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 4 in G major    

Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. This recording of the Fourth Symphony with Edith Mathis (soprano) and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was filmed at the Vienna Musikvereinssaal. "All Mahler symphonies, all Mahler works for that matter, deal in extremes, extremes of dynamic, of tempo, of emotional meaning. When it is bare, it's extremely bare, when it is thick and rich, it's thicker and richer than anything in 'Götterdämmerung', and when it is suffering it suffers to a point that no music has ever suffered before." (Leonard Bernstein)


Thursday , August 9 at 14:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor

Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. This recording of the Fifth Symphony with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was filmed at the Vienna Musikvereinssaal. "All Mahler symphonies, all Mahler works for that matter, deal in extremes, extremes of dynamic, of tempo, of emotional meaning. When it is bare, it's extremely bare, when it is thick and rich, it's thicker and richer than anything in 'Götterdämmerung', and when it is suffering it suffers to a point that no music has ever suffered before." (Leonard Bernstein)


Thursday , August 9 at 21:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 6 in A minor    

Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. This recording of the Sixth Symphony with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was filmed at the Vienna Musikvereinssaal. "All Mahler symphonies, all Mahler works for that matter, deal in extremes, extremes of dynamic, of tempo, of emotional meaning. When it is bare, it's extremely bare, when it is thick and rich, it's thicker and richer than anything in 'Götterdämmerung', and when it is suffering it suffers to a point that no music has ever suffered before." (Leonard Bernstein)


Friday, August 10 at 14:00 | Mahler, Symphony No. 8 in E flat major        

Leonard Bernstein was the first conductor ever to record all of Mahler's symphonies not only on disk, but also on video. The leading Mahler interpreter of the time, Bernstein recorded all of Mahler's symphonies between 1971 and 1985, producing a unique musical document and triggering a major reappreciation of Mahler's works. This recording of the Eighth Symphony was filmed at the Konzerthaus Vienna; with Edda Moser, Judith Blegen, Gerti Zeumer, Ingrid Mayr, Agnes Baltsa, Kenneth Riegel, Hermann Prey and José van Dam, the Chorus of the Vienna State Opera, the Singverein der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, the Vienna Boys' Choir and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. "All Mahler symphonies, all Mahler works for that matter, deal in extremes, extremes of dynamic, of tempo, of emotional meaning. When it is bare, it's extremely bare, when it is thick and rich, it's thicker and richer than anything in 'Götterdämmerung', and when it is suffering it suffers to a point that no music has ever suffered before." (Leonard Bernstein)


Friday, August 10 at 21:00 | Mahler - Symphony No. 10    

The Vienna Philharmonic performs Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 10 in F sharp major, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). This 1975 concert was filmed at Vienna's Wiener Konzerthaus. Mahler undertook the composition of his last symphony in the summer of 1910 in the wake of a major marital crisis, so that the work remained unfinished at the death of the composer, which occurred in Vienna on May 18, 1911. Only the first movement, the Adagio, is fully completed. Although somewhat austere with its incisive sounds, this piece is still imbued with great ethereal beauty.